Main Content

Preguntas Frecuentes sobre la Regla del Cargo Público

octubre de 2019
More information:
What is the public charge rule? Get flyer (PDF)

As of October 11, 2019, the government’s proposed changes to the public charge rule have been blocked by federal judges from going into effect. While the new public charge rule is blocked, it is still safe to enroll in SNAP, housing assistance, and HUSKY. Regardless of whether the new proposed rule goes into effect, it is safe for U.S. citizen children to receive benefits for which they are eligible. Contact an attorney for more advice about your individual situation, and check back on this page for further updates about the new public charge rule.

The new public charge rule says that immigrants who are applying for a green card or entry to the U.S. may denied if they are more likely than not to get certain public benefits from the government in the future. The new public charge rule will become effective on October 15, 2019 unless a judge says otherwise. Applications and petitions submitted to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) that are stamped and mailed before the effective date (October 15, 2019) will not be subject to the rule.

What is a public charge under the new rule?

Under the new rule, a public charge is a non-citizen who gets certain public benefits for more than 12 months within any 36-month period.  If you receive two different benefits in one month, that will be counted as two months toward the 12-month total. For example, if you were to get SNAP (food stamps) and Medicaid (HUSKY) in the same month, this would be counted as two months towards the 12-month total.

If the government considers you likely to be a public charge at any time in the future, you can be denied

  • admission into the U.S., or
  • a green card (also known as Lawful Permanent Resident status).

Under the new rule, USCIS will look at these factors to decide if you are likely to be a public charge:

  • your age;
  • your health;
  • your family status;
  • your education and skills;
  • your assets, resources, and financial status; and
  • whether you have gotten public benefits in the past.

USCIS could decide that you are likely to become a public charge, based on the other factors listed above, even if you never received any public benefits in the past.

Under the new rule, a public benefit includes the following:

  • Any federal, state, local, or tribal cash assistance, including Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), or any other cash benefit program;
  • SNAP (food stamps);
  • Section 8 Housing Assistance under the Housing Choice Voucher Program;
  • Section 8 Project-Based Rental Assistance (including Moderate Rehabilitation);
  • Public housing under Section 9 of the U.S. Housing Act;
  • Medicaid (HUSKY), with certain exceptions.*

*Getting Medicaid (HUSKY) is not considered a public charge for anyone who is under age 21 or pregnant.

USCIS will not consider any public benefits received prior to the new rule’s effective date of October 15, 2019.  (Please note: As of the writing of this webpage, the effective date is October 15, 2019, but this could change depending on ongoing lawsuits.)

Who does the public charge rule apply to?

The rule only applies to people applying for green cards and people seeking admission to the U.S. from abroad. The public charge rule does not apply if

  • you are applying for citizenship;
  • you already have a green card (you’re already a Lawful Permanent Resident), unless you leave the country without permission for more than 180 days at one time and return [1];
  • you are renewing your green card;
  • you are replacing your lost or stolen green card;
  • you are a naturalized citizen;
  • you are applying for a green card based on an approved U Visa or T Visa;
  • you are applying for a green card based on an approved VAWA Self-Petition;
  • you are applying for a green card based on an approved Special Immigrant Juvenile Petition; or
  • you are a refugee or asylee.

If you are in one of these categories, you can use ANY benefits you qualify for, including cash aid, health care, food programs, and other non-cash programs. This is true for both the current rule and the new rule.

The new rule also affects requests to extend a non-immigrant visa or to change your non-immigrant status. An example of a request to extend a non-immigrant visa would be asking to stay longer on a visitor’s visa. An example of a request to change status would be asking to change from a student visa to an employment visa. Under the new rule, USCIS would not consider if you are more likely than not to be a public charge in the future. Instead, they will only look at whether you have gotten public benefits for more than 12 months in the 36-month period since you obtained nonimmigrant status.

Does the new rule mean I could be deported as a public charge?

The new rule does not change the rules about being deported. [2]

It is extremely rare that an individual could be deported solely on the grounds of public charge.

Should we stop any Medicaid (HUSKY), SNAP (food stamps), or housing assistance benefits that we are getting now?

USCIS will not consider SNAP, HUSKY or housing benefits received before the new rule’s effective date, which is currently October 15, 2019. (Note: It is possible that the effective date of the rule may be delayed.)

NOTE: USCIS will consider TANF (cash) and/or SSI that you may have received prior to October 15, 2019 in its public charge determination.

If you are unsure if you should keep getting benefits, you should talk to an immigration attorney to discuss what might happen if you keep getting benefits after the effective date. Each situation is different and it’s best to discuss your situation with an attorney if you can.

What if my child gets Medicaid (HUSKY) health coverage?

The government will not consider your child’s use of Medicaid (HUSKY) in your application for a green card. Children who are U.S. citizens are not subject to the public charge rule. Children who are Lawful Permanent Residents are also not subject to the public charge rule unless they leave the country for more than 180 days at a time and return. [3]

Children who are applying for a green card are subject to the new rule. However, a child’s use of Medicaid (HUSKY) will not be counted against them. A child’s use of public benefits other than Medicaid (HUSKY) will be counted against them.

What benefits would not be included under the proposed rule?

Using these benefits will not hurt your chances of getting a green card:

Disaster relief; emergency medical assistance; state, local, or tribal programs (other than cash assistance) that are not federal; benefits received by your family members; education; child development (such as Head Start or Early Head Start); employment and job training programs; transportation vouchers or non-cash transportation services; federal earned income tax credit; child tax credit; student loans; energy assistance; free and reduced school lunch; WIC; Medicaid for children and pregnant women; and any other benefit not specifically listed in the proposed rule.

Does the Connecticut Department of Social Services (DSS) share my information with ICE or immigration officials?

No. DSS will check to make sure you are eligible for the program, but it does not share the information with ICE or immigration officials. [4]

Notes:

[1] The public charge rule may be applied to green card holders who leave the U.S. for more than 180 continuous days (about 6 months) and then try to reenter the United States. If you are planning to stay outside of the U.S. for more than 180 days, you should speak with an immigration attorney or DOJ-accredited representative before you leave the U.S.

 [2] Under current law, in extremely rare circumstances, a person who has become a public charge could be deported. For example,

  • if you use cash assistance or long-term care within five years of becoming a lawful permanent resident for reasons that existed before you entered the country; and
  • you or your sponsor were asked to pay for these services; and
  • you or your sponsor refused to pay.

These rules are very narrow and have almost never been applied.

[3] The public charge rule may be applied to green card holders who leave the U.S. for more than 180 continuous days (about 6 months) and then try to reenter the United States.  You should speak with an immigration attorney or DOJ-accredited representative before you leave the U.S.

[4] If you are undocumented, you can apply for your U.S. citizen children without giving information about your own immigration status. You only have to give information about your child’s citizenship or immigration status. You do not have to give immigration status information about yourself or others in your household who are not applying for benefits. If you are undocumented, seeking to apply only for your citizen children, and you are asked to apply on your own behalf, contact legal services.

Important: Do not lie when completing public benefit applications or dealing with any government agency.

Más información:
¿Qué es la Regla del Cargo Público? Obtener folleto (PDF)

Desde el 11 de octubre de 2019, los propuestos cambios del gobierno a la regla del cargo público han sido bloqueados de entrar en vigencia por jueces federales. Mientras la nueva regla del cargo público está bloqueada, sigue siendo seguro solicitar cupones de alimentos (SNAP), asistencia de vivienda y seguro médico (HUSKY).  A pesar de que si la nueva regla propuesta entre en vigencia o no, es seguro que los niños ciudadanos americanos reciban beneficios por los cuales son elegibles.  Comuníquese con un abogado para mas consejo sobre su situación individual, y verifica de nuevo en esta página para actualizaciones adicionales sobre la nueva regla del cargo público.

La nueva regla del cargo público dice que los inmigrantes que solicitan una tarjeta de residente (green card) o la entrada a los EE.UU. pueden negarse si tienen más probabilidades de recibir uno o más de ciertos beneficios públicos del gobierno en el futuro. La nueva regla con respecto al cargo público entrará en vigencia el 15 de octubre de 2019, a menos que un juez diga que la nueva regla no puede entrar en vigencia. Las solicitudes y peticiones enviadas a los Servicios de Ciudadanía e Inmigración de EE.UU. (con las siglas de USCIS en inglés) que tengan un sello postal antes de la fecha de vigencia (15 de octubre de 2019) no estarán sujetas a la regla.

¿Qué es un cargo público?

Según la nueva regla, un cargo público es cuando un inmigrante no ciudadano recibe ciertos beneficios públicos durante más de 12 meses dentro de un período de 36 meses. Si recibe dos beneficios diferentes en un mes, se contarán como dos meses para el total de 12 meses. Por ejemplo, según la nueva regla, si recibe Asistencia Nutricional Suplementaria (SNAP) y Medicaid (HUSKY) en el mismo mes, esto se contará como dos meses para el total de doce meses.

Si el gobierno considera que es probable que usted sea un cargo público en cualquier momento en el futuro, se le puede negar:

  • Admisión a los EE. UU., o
  • Una tarjeta de residente, (también conocida como estatus de Residente Permanente Legal).

Según la nueva regla, USCIS analizará su edad, salud, estado familiar, educación, habilidades, activos, recursos y estado financiero, así como el recibo pasado de beneficios públicos, para decidir si es probable que usted sea un cargo público. USCIS podría determinar que es probable que se convierta en un cargo público, basado en los otros factores arriba descritos, incluso si nunca recibió beneficios públicos en el pasado

Bajo la nueva regla, un beneficio público incluye:

  • Cualquier asistencia monetaria federal, estatal, local o tribal, incluyendo los Ingresos de Seguridad Suplementarios (SSI), Asistencia Temporal para Familias Necesitadas (TANF) o cualquier otro programa de beneficios monetarios;
  • Programa de Asistencia Nutricional Suplementaria (SNAP), también conocido como cupones de alimentos;
  • Sección 8 Asistencia de Vivienda bajo el Programa de Vales de Elección de Vivienda;
  • Asistencia de alquiler basada en proyectos de la Sección 8 (incluyendo la rehabilitación moderada);
  • Vivienda pública según la Sección 9 de la Ley de Vivienda de EE. UU.
  • Medicaid (HUSKY), con ciertas excepciones.*

* El recibo de Medicaid (HUSKY) no es un cargo público para las personas que usan HUSKY menores de 21 años y mujeres embarazadas.

USCIS no considerará ningún beneficio público recibido antes de la fecha de vigencia de la nueva regla del 15 de octubre de 2019 (a menos que se detenga por litigio).

¿A quién le aplica la regla de cargo público?

La regla solo se aplica a las personas que solicitan las tarjetas de residencia y a las personas que desean ingresar a los EE. UU. La regla de cargo público no aplica si:

  • Ya tiene una tarjeta de residencia (es un residente permanente legal), al menos que salga del país sin permiso durante más de 180 días a la vez y regrese [1];
  • Está renovando su tarjeta de residencia;
  • Está reemplazando su tarjeta de residencia perdida o robada;
  • Eres un ciudadano naturalizado;
  • Está solicitando una tarjeta de residencia basada en una Visa U o Visa T aprobada;
  • Está solicitando una tarjeta de residencia basada en una Petición de VAWA aprobada;
  • Está solicitando una tarjeta de residencia basada en una Petición Especial de Inmigrante Juvenil aprobada; o
  • Eres un refugiado o asilado.

Si se encuentra en una de estas categorías, puede usar CUALQUIER beneficio por los cuales usted cualifica, incluyendo asistencia monetaria atención médica, programas de alimentos y otros programas no monetarios. Esto es cierto para la regla actual y la nueva regla.

La nueva regla también afecta las solicitudes de extender una visa de no inmigrante o cambiar su estatus de no inmigrante. [2]

¿La nueva regla significa que podría ser deportado como un cargo público?

La nueva regla no cambia las reglas sobre la deportación. [3]

¿Deberíamos suspender los beneficios de Medicaid (HUSKY), SNAP (cupones para alimentos) o asistencia para vivienda que estamos recibiendo ahora?

USCIS no considerará ningún beneficio público recibido antes de la fecha de vigencia de la nueva norma, que actualmente es el 15 de octubre de 2019. (Nota: es posible que la fecha de vigencia de la norma se demore como resultado de un litigio).

Si no está seguro de continuar recibiendo beneficios, consulte a un abogado de inmigración para analizar las posibles consecuencias de permanecer inscrito después de la fecha de vigencia. Cada situación es diferente y el mejor plan para usted depende de sus circunstancias personales.

¿Qué sucede si mi hijo recibe cobertura de salud de Medicaid (HUSKY)?

El gobierno no considerará el uso de Medicaid (HUSKY) por parte de su hijo en su solicitud de una tarjeta de residencia. Los niños que son ciudadanos estadounidenses no están sujetos a la regla de cargo público. Los niños que son residentes permanentes legales tampoco están sujetos a la regla de cargo público, al menos que abandonen el país por más de 180 días a la vez y regresen. [4]

Los niños que solicitan una tarjeta de residencia están sujetos a la nueva regla; sin embargo, el uso de Medicaid (HUSKY) por un niño no se contará en su contra. El uso de beneficios públicos de un niño que no sea Medicaid (HUSKY) se contará en su contra.

¿Qué beneficios no se incluirían en la regla propuesta?

El uso de estos beneficios no afectará sus posibilidades de obtener una tarjeta de residente:

Alivio de desastres; asistencia médica de emergencia; programas completamente estatales, locales o tribales (que no sean asistencia monetaria); beneficios recibidos por los miembros de su familia; educación; desarrollo infantil (como Head Start o Early Head Start); programas de empleo y capacitación laboral; comprobantes  de transporte o servicios de transporte que no sean monetarios; crédito tributario federal por ingreso del trabajo; crédito tributario por hijos; préstamos estudiantiles; Asistencia de energía eléctrica; almuerzo escolar gratis y de precio reducido; Programa de Nutrición Suplementaria para Mujeres, Bebés y Niños (WIC); Medicaid para niños y mujeres embarazadas y cualquier otro beneficio no incluido específicamente en la regla propuesta.

¿El Departamento de Servicios Sociales de Connecticut (DSS) comparte mi información con ICE o funcionarios de inmigración?

No. DSS verificará para asegurarse de que usted es elegible para el programa, pero no comparte la información con ICE ni con funcionarios de inmigración. [5]

Notas:

[1] La regla de cargo público se puede aplicar a los titulares de la tarjeta de residente que salen de los EE. UU. por más de 180 días continuos (aproximadamente 6 meses) y luego intentan volver a ingresar a los Estados Unidos. Debe hablar con un abogado de inmigración o un representante acreditado por el Departamento de Justicia antes de salir de los EE. UU.

[2] Las solicitudes para extender una visa de no inmigrante incluirían, por ejemplo, permanecer más tiempo con una visa de visitante. Las solicitudes para cambiar el estado incluirían, por ejemplo, el cambio de una visa de estudiante a una visa de empleo. Bajo la nueva regla, el requisito de futuro de la determinación del cargo público se ha eliminado para las personas que solicitan extender o cambiar su estatus de no inmigrante. En cambio, USCIS solo considerará si la persona ha recibido los beneficios mencionados anteriormente durante más de 12 meses dentro de un período de 36 meses desde que obtuvo el estatus de no inmigrante del que busca cambiar o extender.

[3] Según la ley actual, en circunstancias extremadamente raras, una persona que se ha convertido en un cargo público podría ser deportada. Por ejemplo,

  • Si utiliza asistencia monetaria o atención médica a largo plazo dentro de los cinco años de haberse convertido en residente legal permanente por razones que existían antes de ingresar al país, y
  • A usted o su patrocinador se les pidió que pagaran por estos servicios, y
  • Usted o su patrocinador se negaron a pagar.

Estas reglas son muy estrechas y casi nunca se han aplicado.

[4] La regla de cargo público se puede aplicar a los titulares de la tarjeta de residente que salen de los EE. UU. por más de 180 días continuos (aproximadamente 6 meses) y luego intentan volver a ingresar a los Estados Unidos. Debe hablar con un abogado de inmigración o un representante acreditado por el Departamento de Justicia antes de salir de los EE. UU.

[5] Si eres indocumentado, puedes solicitar a tus hijos ciudadanos estadounidenses sin dar información sobre tu propio estado migratorio. Solo tiene que dar información sobre la ciudadanía o el estado de inmigración de su hijo. No tiene que dar información sobre el estado de inmigración de usted u otras personas en su hogar que no solicitan beneficios. Puede proporcionar solo la información necesaria. Si usted es indocumentado y busca presentar una solicitud solo para sus hijos ciudadanos, y se le solicita que presente su solicitud en su propio nombre, comuníquese con servicios legales.

No debe dar información falsa al completar solicitudes de beneficio público o al tratar con cualquier agencia gubernamental.

Obtenga Ayuda de Asistencia Legal

Mayor de 60 años: Obtenga ayuda legal.
Menor de 60 años: Encuentre ayuda legal o llene una solicitud en línea.
¿No es de Connecticut? Encuentre ayuda en otro estado.