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The Temporary Rental Housing Assistance Program (TRHAP) is open. Get information on the TRHAP website.
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Rent and Evictions during the COVID-19 Crisis

November 2020

We will update this page as more information is made available. Please check back often.

The State of Connecticut Temporary Rental Housing Assistance Program (TRHAP) is open.

All submissions will be accepted through a web portal, and there are a few ways to access the TRHAP Portal:

  • Visit https://www.chfa.org/trhap.
  • Contact the Call Center at 860-785-3111.
  • Allow your landlord to input your information into the TRHAP Portal.
  • If you don't agree with a decision about your request for THRAP, email trhapappeals@ct.gov.

Actualizaremos esta página a medida que haya más información disponible. Por favor entre de nuevo con frecuencia.

El Programa Temporaria de Asistencia para Pagar la Renta (TRHAP) del Estado esta abierto.

Todas las solicitudes serán aceptadas a través del portal en línea. Sin embargo, hay muchas formas de acceder al portal de TRHAP:

  • Visitar https://www.chfa.org/trhap.
  • Llamar al Centro de Llamadas al 860-785-3111.
  • Autorizar a su Propietario de Vivienda, el poder ingresar la información en el portal de TRHAP en nombre de usted.
  • Si no está de acuerdo con una decisión sobre su solicitud de THRAP, envíe un correo electrónico a trhapappeals@ct.gov.

New nationwide CDC eviction moratorium starting September 4:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a nationwide eviction moratorium from September 4 through December 31, 2020. A moratorium is a temporary halt on evictions. The CDC moratorium prevents landlords from evicting tenants for not paying rent, not paying other charges such as late fees, or because their lease ended, but it is NOT automaticTo be protected, each adult in your household must give a copy of this signed declaration to your landlord.

Get the CDC Declaration in English/Spanish. It can also be found in these languages: Arabic | BurmeseSimplified Chinese | Traditional Chinese | Creole | Haitian CreoleHmong | Punjabi (Gurmukhī| RussianSomaliSpanish | TagalogVietnamese

Does the CDC moratorium cover my situation?

Your situation is covered under the CDC moratorium if

  • you are behind on your rent or your lease is up but an eviction case has not yet been started against you;
  • you have a pending eviction case in court because you didn’t pay rent or because you didn’t move out after your lease ended; OR
  • you already went to court and lost your eviction case because you didn’t pay rent or you didn’t move out after your lease ended, but you are still living in your apartment and a marshal has not evicted you yet;

AND

  • you expect your total income for 2020 to be below $99,000 (or $198,000 for 2 adults), you qualified for a stimulus check, OR you did not have to report income in 2019;
  • you cannot pay your full rent because of income loss or very high medical bills;
  • you or the people in your household will likely become homeless or forced to “live in close quarters” in someone else’s home if you are evicted;
  • you promise to make timely partial rent payments that are as close to the full payment as you can; and
  • you have made your best effort to apply for governmental rent and housing assistance. 

Note: To learn what rent and housing assistance is available, dial 2-1-1.

How can I make sure I am protected by the CDC moratorium?

First, every adult in your household must sign this declaration form about their income, ability to pay rent, efforts to attempt to obtain rental assistance, and harm to you if you get evicted. (Note: The declaration requires you to sign that the information is true and correct, under penalty of perjury.) 

Then, you must give the completed declarations to your landlord as soon as possible. If you already have an eviction court case, you should also give a copy of the declarations to the court. Read the below steps for detailed instructions.

  1. If you have access to a printer, print a copy of the declaration for each adult in your household and have every adult complete a declaration. If you do not have access to a printer, you can write out the declarations by hand.

  2. Next, give the signed declarations to your landlord by email, mail, or hand delivery as soon as possible. To send the signed declarations by email, you can either scan or take photos of the signed declarations and text or email them to your landlord.

  3. Save a copy of everything you give to your landlord for your own records. If you can’t make paper copies of the declarations, you can instead take photos of the declarations using your phone and email the photos to yourself for safe keeping. Also remember to make a note of the date you delivered the declarations.

  4. If you already have an eviction court case, you should also give a copy of the declarations to the court. If you can’t make paper copies of the declarations, you can print out the declaration twice, or handwrite the declaration twice, and give one declaration to your landlord and one declaration to the court. Here’s how you can give the declaration to the court:

  1. Look at the list of open courthouses on the Judicial Branch website to see which Superior Court is open in your area.
  2. Make sure to include your name, phone number, and address on the form so the court can contact you.
  3. Go to the open Superior Court and put the form in the lobby’s lock box.
  4. Save a copy of everything you gave to the court and make a note of the date you delivered it.

Your declaration must say:

  • You expect your total income for 2020 to be below $99,000 (or $198,000 for 2 adults), you qualified for a stimulus check, or you did not have to report income in 2019;
  • you cannot pay your full rent because of income loss or very high medical bills;
  • you or the people in your household will likely become homeless or forced to “live in close quarters” in someone else’s home if you are evicted;
  • you promise to make timely partial rent payments that are as close to the full payment as you can; and
  • you have made your best effort to apply for governmental rent and housing assistance.
    (Note: To learn what rent and housing assistance is available call 211).

Again, you can use this declaration form.

Which eviction cases are not covered by the CDC moratorium?

The CDC moratorium will still allow landlords to bring an eviction case if they claim the tenant is involved in criminal activity, threatening the health or safety of other tenants, or breaking the rules in their lease.

How does the CDC moratorium relate to Connecticut’s eviction moratorium?

The national CDC moratorium is in addition to the State of Connecticut’s moratorium, which prevents landlords from filing many kinds of eviction cases until January 1, 2021. The CDC Moratorium described above gives more protections to tenants who are behind on rent or whose lease is up. This is because it goes through December 31 and protects tenants at all stages of the eviction process.

Connecticut’s eviction moratorium will remain in effect no matter what happens with the federal CDC moratorium. It also prevents landlords from filing some types of eviction cases that the federal CDC moratorium does not cover.

Note: If your landlord gives you a Notice to Quit, which is the form used to start the eviction process, they must also give you a copy of the CDC declaration, in both English and Spanish, that you can fill out and return to them.

Important note: If you have already lost your eviction case but you are still in your apartment and have not yet been evicted by a marshal, you should fill out the declaration and give it to your landlord and the court immediately. This is urgent because a marshal can now serve you with an Execution for Possession (the court document that gives a marshal permission to evict you). The Execution for Possession will give you at least 24 hours to move on your own before the marshal can return and physically remove you and your belongings. If you give the declaration to your landlord before the marshal serves you with the Execution for Possession, you may be able to temporarily delay your eviction through December 31, 2020. For more information about this process, see What Happens if I Lose?

Paying rent:

  • Unfortunately, there are no more rent extensions. If you can, you should pay your rent by the 10th of the month, or by the end of your monthly grace period if your lease starts in the middle of the month.
  • If you paid a security deposit that is more than one month’s rent, you can use part of your security deposit toward back rent that was due between April 1 and September 30. Here is a letter you can give your landlord asking to use part of your security deposit towards rent.
  • You still owe rent even if you have delivered a CDC declaration form to your landlord. Delivering a CDC declaration form temporarily prevents your landlord from evicting you for nonpayment of rent until December 31, 2020. However, your landlord may sue you for unpaid rent as a debt or try to evict you in 2021.

What if I can’t pay my rent?

You are still responsible for paying your rent. But until at least January 1, 2021, your landlord can only evict you for nonpayment of rent if

  • you did not pay rent due on or before February 29, 2020; OR
  • you owe six months or more of rent due on or after March 1, 2020.

If you complete the CDC moratorium declaration and give it to your landlord, your landlord may not be able to start an eviction case until at least January 1, 2020.

Note: Your landlord may still be able to

  • charge you late fees if your lease says they can;
  • report your rent as late to a credit bureau or a tenant screening service;
  • sue you for unpaid rent as a debt; and/or
  • raise your rent when your current lease ends.

Note about rent increases: You should not agree to a rent increase if you cannot afford it. If you do not agree, tell the landlord and keep paying the last rent amount you agreed to pay. See our page on rent increases.

If you are behind on your rent, talk to your landlord about your situation and ask to make a payment plan. Here is a letter you can use to tell your landlord in writing that you can’t pay rent for a reason related to COVID-19. If you are able to make a payment plan, try to get the agreement in writing and save a copy for your records.

  • Even if you don’t pay your rent, your landlord cannot ever lock you out, physically remove you from your home, or shut off your utilities. Your landlord must go through the eviction court process in order to remove you.
  • If you are able to pay some or all of your rent, keep good records of all your payments, including the amount, date, and what the payment was for. If you pay by cash, make sure to ask you landlord for a receipt. Your landlord is required by law to give you one.

What if my landlord tries to change the locks, cut off my utilities, or remove my belongings, outside doors, or windows?

All of these acts are considered illegal lockouts because they interfere with your ability to live in your apartment. A lockout is a crime. If you feel safe calling the police, you have a right to call the police right away and ask them to order your landlord to

  • let you back into your apartment,
  • restore your utilities,
  • return your belongings, and
  • reinstall any missing doors, locks, walls, or windows.

You can also:

  1. Call your utility company.
    - United Illuminating: 1-800-722-5584
    - Eversource: 1-800-286-2000
    - Southern Connecticut Gas Company: 1-800-659-8299
  2. Call your town or city housing code enforcement office.
  3. Call Statewide Legal Services at 1-800-453-3320 for legal help and information.
  4. Call a local community group that may be able to help you to enforce your rights.
  5. File a complaint with the Attorney General’s office using the form on their website: https://www.dir.ct.gov/ag/complaint/

You also have a right to file a civil lockout lawsuit asking the court to order your landlord to let you back in. These are considered the type of emergencies that the court is acting on right now. For legal help, call Statewide Legal Services at 1-800-453-3320. To learn where and when you can file a lockout lawsuit, see our page on court updates during the COVID-19 crisis. To learn more about lockouts, visit our page on evictions and lockouts.

If you need legal help, call Statewide Legal Services at 1-800-453-3320. For more legal information on evictions in Connecticut, visit our page on Evictions and Lockouts. For information about benefits, work, court access, and more visit www.ctlawhelp.org/coronavirus.

Information for Public Housing, Section 8, and Voucher/RAP Tenants

Information for Public Housing, Section 8, and Voucher/RAP Tenants

If someone in your household has lost work hours and/or income because of the COVID-19 pandemic, you can report the loss of income to your site manager or caseworker and ask to have your rent lowered.

How to apply for a rent adjustment

You will need to report your lost income and make your rent adjustment request in writing to your site manager or case worker.

  • You can enter your information into this online form, and it will create a letter for you to send to your site manager/caseworker. (Or if you are a participant in any Housing Authority of New Haven/ Elm City Communities program, you can use this HANH/ECC form to directly submit your request to HANH/ECC.)
  • You can also fill in this blank letter yourself and then email, mail, or hand-deliver the letter and proof of your change in income to your site manager’s/caseworker’s office.

If you can, please provide documents showing your change in income when you make the request. 

  • Examples include a paystub or a letter from your employer saying that your hours have been reduced or that you no longer have your job.
  • You can ask your employer for a copy of your paystubs or a letter, and you can use your cellphone to take screenshots of this paperwork in order to upload the documents to the online forms or to add them as attachments to your email.

If you do not have documents showing your change in income, you should still ask for the rent adjustment anyway. You can discuss with your case worker or property manager what documentation you will need and when you will be able to get it (or whether they can help get it by contacting your employer directly). You may be able to self-certify (sign a sworn statement) about your change in income and have the rent change processed until you can get the documents from your employer.

Remember to save your emails, and take pictures of any paperwork you mail or hand-deliver so you have a copy for your own records.

NOTE: Your stimulus payment does not count as income or a resource for any public benefit programs like TFA, Medicaid, or SNAP.  It also does not count as income in calculating rent for the state Rental Assistance Program (RAP) or any state funded housing.  In addition, both HUD and the Department of Housing have said that the stimulus payment and the extra $600 some people will be getting as unemployment will not be counted as income in calculating rent for federal public housing, Section 8, or any federally assisted housing.

New nationwide CDC eviction moratorium starting September 4:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a nationwide eviction moratorium from September 4 through December 31, 2020. A moratorium is a temporary halt on evictions. The CDC moratorium prevents landlords from evicting tenants for not paying rent, not paying other charges such as late fees, or because their lease ended, but it is NOT automaticTo be protected, each adult in your household must give a copy of this signed declaration to your landlord.

Get the CDC Declaration in English/Spanish. It can also be found in these languages: Arabic | BurmeseSimplified Chinese | Traditional Chinese | Creole | Haitian CreoleHmong | Punjabi (Gurmukhī| RussianSomaliSpanish | TagalogVietnamese

Does the CDC moratorium cover my situation?

Your situation is covered under the CDC moratorium if

  • you are behind on your rent or your lease is up but an eviction case has not yet been started against you;
  • you have a pending eviction case in court because you didn’t pay rent or because you didn’t move out after your lease ended; OR
  • you already went to court and lost your eviction case because you didn’t pay rent or you didn’t move out after your lease ended, but you are still living in your apartment and a marshal has not evicted you yet;

AND

  • you expect your total income for 2020 to be below $99,000 (or $198,000 for 2 adults), you qualified for a stimulus check, OR you did not have to report income in 2019;
  • you cannot pay your full rent because of income loss or very high medical bills;
  • you or the people in your household will likely become homeless or forced to “live in close quarters” in someone else’s home if you are evicted;
  • you promise to make timely partial rent payments that are as close to the full payment as you can; and
  • you have made your best effort to apply for governmental rent and housing assistance. 

Note: To learn what rent and housing assistance is available, dial 2-1-1.

How can I make sure I am protected by the CDC moratorium?

First, every adult in your household must sign this declaration form about their income, ability to pay rent, efforts to attempt to obtain rental assistance, and harm to you if you get evicted. (Note: The declaration requires you to sign that the information is true and correct, under penalty of perjury.) 

Then, you must give the completed declarations to your landlord as soon as possible. If you already have an eviction court case, you should also give a copy of the declarations to the court. Read the below steps for detailed instructions.

  1. If you have access to a printer, print a copy of the declaration for each adult in your household and have every adult complete a declaration. If you do not have access to a printer, you can write out the declarations by hand.

  2. Next, give the signed declarations to your landlord by email, mail, or hand delivery as soon as possible. To send the signed declarations by email, you can either scan or take photos of the signed declarations and text or email them to your landlord.

  3. Save a copy of everything you give to your landlord for your own records. If you can’t make paper copies of the declarations, you can instead take photos of the declarations using your phone and email the photos to yourself for safe keeping. Also remember to make a note of the date you delivered the declarations.

  4. If you already have an eviction court case, you should also give a copy of the declarations to the court. If you can’t make paper copies of the declarations, you can print out the declaration twice, or handwrite the declaration twice, and give one declaration to your landlord and one declaration to the court. Here’s how you can give the declaration to the court:

  1. Look at the list of open courthouses on the Judicial Branch website to see which Superior Court is open in your area.
  2. Make sure to include your name, phone number, and address on the form so the court can contact you.
  3. Go to the open Superior Court and put the form in the lobby’s lock box.
  4. Save a copy of everything you gave to the court and make a note of the date you delivered it.

Your declaration must say:

  • You expect your total income for 2020 to be below $99,000 (or $198,000 for 2 adults), you qualified for a stimulus check, or you did not have to report income in 2019;
  • you cannot pay your full rent because of income loss or very high medical bills;
  • you or the people in your household will likely become homeless or forced to “live in close quarters” in someone else’s home if you are evicted;
  • you promise to make timely partial rent payments that are as close to the full payment as you can; and
  • you have made your best effort to apply for governmental rent and housing assistance.
    (Note: To learn what rent and housing assistance is available call 211).

Again, you can use this declaration form.

Which eviction cases are not covered by the CDC moratorium?

The CDC moratorium will still allow landlords to bring an eviction case if they claim the tenant is involved in criminal activity, threatening the health or safety of other tenants, or breaking the rules in their lease.

How does the CDC moratorium relate to Connecticut’s eviction moratorium?

The national CDC moratorium is in addition to the State of Connecticut’s moratorium, which prevents landlords from filing many kinds of eviction cases until January 1, 2021. The CDC Moratorium described above gives more protections to tenants who are behind on rent or whose lease is up. This is because it goes through December 31 and protects tenants at all stages of the eviction process.

Connecticut’s eviction moratorium will remain in effect no matter what happens with the federal CDC moratorium. It also prevents landlords from filing some types of eviction cases that the federal CDC moratorium does not cover.

Note: If your landlord gives you a Notice to Quit, which is the form used to start the eviction process, they must also give you a copy of the CDC declaration, in both English and Spanish, that you can fill out and return to them.

Important note: If you have already lost your eviction case but you are still in your apartment and have not yet been evicted by a marshal, you should fill out the declaration and give it to your landlord and the court immediately. This is urgent because a marshal can now serve you with an Execution for Possession (the court document that gives a marshal permission to evict you). The Execution for Possession will give you at least 24 hours to move on your own before the marshal can return and physically remove you and your belongings. If you give the declaration to your landlord before the marshal serves you with the Execution for Possession, you may be able to temporarily delay your eviction through December 31, 2020. For more information about this process, see What Happens if I Lose?

Paying rent:

  • Unfortunately, there are no more rent extensions. If you can, you should pay your rent by the 10th of the month, or by the end of your monthly grace period if your lease starts in the middle of the month.
  • If you paid a security deposit that is more than one month’s rent, you can use part of your security deposit toward back rent that was due between April 1 and September 30. Here is a letter you can give your landlord asking to use part of your security deposit towards rent.
  • You still owe rent even if you have delivered a CDC declaration form to your landlord. Delivering a CDC declaration form temporarily prevents your landlord from evicting you for nonpayment of rent until December 31, 2020. However, your landlord may sue you for unpaid rent as a debt or try to evict you in 2021.

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Under age 60: Find legal help or apply online.
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