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Family & Safety

Domestic violence, child custody and visitation, child support, children’s rights, divorce and separation, bullying, problems with DCF.

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If you are in danger of being hurt by a family member or someone you are or have been dating, you can ask the family court for a temporary restraining order (TRO). A temporary restraining order is a paper from the court that tells someone to stop hurting, threatening, or stalking you.

If you and the other parent agree on custody and visitation, your child probably doesn't need a lawyer. But you may want to ask for one if you and the other parent disagree about custody or visitation; you are worried about your child’s safety; or there is a question about paternity.

Here are some things you can do if your child is being bullied in school.

The Safe at Home program is available for Connecticut residents who are or have been victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, or risk of injury to a minor. If you have moved or are planning to move and want to keep your new address private, Safe at Home can help.

CT SAVIN is a free victim notification service for events happening in the criminal court.

Going to court can be stressful. This video will cover everything you need to know about getting ready for a court hearing, including what to wear, who to bring with you, what happens when you see the judge, meeting with a mediator, and more. We hope that you'll feel more at ease and prepared after you watch this video.

Do you use Facebook, Twitter, or other social networking sites? Do you have a smartphone? This article can help you stay safe if you're experiencing family violence.

Are you missing work because of a violent relationship? Your employer must let you take time if you need to go to a: doctor, counselor, domestic violence agency, court hearing, Victim Advocate, etc., or to move to be safe. Read this to learn how to ask for time off, how much you have to tell your employer, and more.

If you can't afford a lawyer, you may have to represent yourself in family court. Here are some tips to help your day in court go more smoothly.

If your custody or visitation arrangement isn't working, you might be able to get it changed. This article will tell you when an order might be changed, the steps you can take, the court hearing, and more. 

Learn how to file a motion for contempt if the other parent has disobeyed a court order, such as orders of custody, child support, visitation, medical bills, or health insurance. 

If you can’t afford to pay court fees, you can ask the court for a fee waiver. A fee waiver allows people with very low income to skip paying court costs and fees. You can probably get a fee waiver if you get public benefits such as welfare, food stamps, SNAP, or SSI.

Families Change provides information to help kids, teens, and parents deal with a family breakup like a divorce or separation.

If you and the other parent agree on custody and visitation, your child probably doesn't need a lawyer. But you may want to ask for one if you and the other parent disagree about custody or visitation; you are worried about your child’s safety; or there is a question about paternity.

Family Services is available to help families and the courts solve problems with child custody, visitation, restraining orders, and more.

As a father, you have the right to see your child—even if you are behind on child support. Read this article to learn your rights about paternity, visitation, custody, child support, if your child is moving, and more.

Going to court can be stressful. This video will cover everything you need to know about getting ready for a court hearing, including what to wear, who to bring with you, what happens when you see the judge, meeting with a mediator, and more. We hope that you'll feel more at ease and prepared after you watch this video.

In divorce, separation, and custody cases, parents must give their financial information to the court. The court needs this information to make orders about child support, alimony, or legal fees.

Get information about child support services in Connecticut, what what happens when you go to family court, parenting education programs in Connecticut, and more.

If you can't afford a lawyer, you may have to represent yourself in family court. Here are some tips to help your day in court go more smoothly.

If you believe that your child support order is too low (or too high), this article may help. You can get help from the state Child Support Program or do it on your own.

You must have a court order to get child support. You can get child support you have custody or the child lives with you, the other parent can be located, and a court orders child support.

Child support is usually paid until the child turns 18 or leaves high school. You will probably continue paying even if the child’s other parent gets married or lives with someone else, you don’t see the child, or you are in prison or unemployed.

Learn how to file a motion for contempt if the other parent has disobeyed a court order, such as orders of custody, child support, visitation, medical bills, or health insurance. 

If you can’t afford to pay court fees, you can ask the court for a fee waiver. A fee waiver allows people with very low income to skip paying court costs and fees. You can probably get a fee waiver if you get public benefits such as welfare, food stamps, SNAP, or SSI.

Families Change provides information to help kids, teens, and parents deal with a family breakup like a divorce or separation.

If you and the other parent agree on custody and visitation, your child probably doesn't need a lawyer. But you may want to ask for one if you and the other parent disagree about custody or visitation; you are worried about your child’s safety; or there is a question about paternity.

Family Services is available to help families and the courts solve problems with child custody, visitation, restraining orders, and more.

As a father, you have the right to see your child—even if you are behind on child support. Read this article to learn your rights about paternity, visitation, custody, child support, if your child is moving, and more.

Going to court can be stressful. This video will cover everything you need to know about getting ready for a court hearing, including what to wear, who to bring with you, what happens when you see the judge, meeting with a mediator, and more. We hope that you'll feel more at ease and prepared after you watch this video.

Your child has the right to be supported by both parents. If you are the person taking care of your child, you have the right to get child support from your child’s father.

In divorce, separation, and custody cases, parents must give their financial information to the court. The court needs this information to make orders about child support, alimony, or legal fees.

Get information about child support services in Connecticut, what what happens when you go to family court, parenting education programs in Connecticut, and more.

If you can't afford a lawyer, you may have to represent yourself in family court. Here are some tips to help your day in court go more smoothly.

Is money being taken out of your pay because you owe a debt? A wage attachment is a court order that forces your employer to take money from your paycheck to pay the debt. Read this to learn when that can happen, how much can be taken, what you can do if you can’t afford it, and more.

This brochure answers frequently asked questions about what happens when you go to court for child support.

If you are a father, you can be required to pay child support if you are not the main person taking care of your child. If you show care and concern for your child, including financial support, you may have the right to custody or visitation.

If you and the other parent agree on custody and visitation, your child probably doesn't need a lawyer. But you may want to ask for one if you and the other parent disagree about custody or visitation; you are worried about your child’s safety; or there is a question about paternity.

There are rules to make schools a safe place to learn. Read this to learn about school rules, where your child can go to school, missing school, truancy, discipline, bullying, and more.

If you want to live on your own and make your own decisions, emancipation may help you. Emancipation means that you are no longer under your parents' control. It is a big decision, no matter what your reasons are.

This article explains Connecticut laws about lead poisoning.

Here are some things you can do if your child is being bullied in school.

TFA is Temporary Family Assistance. It’s usually called "welfare" or "state." TFA is Connecticut’s cash assistance program for low-income parents, including teenage parents, and their children.

This video describes the rights of students under the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. These are federal laws, so the information is true no matter where you live.

Were you kicked out of your house? Did you run away? Do you live in a shelter or temporarily with a friend? Did your family lose their housing?

Families Change provides information to help kids, teens, and parents deal with a family breakup like a divorce or separation.

If you were arrested when you were under 18, you probably have a juvenile record. The good news is that most juvenile records can be erased.

This book covers typical issues and events that may happen to families with child abuse or neglect problems. It does not provide legal advice or cover what may happen if someone is arrested for hurting a family member. You will get the most out of this information if you use it as a general guide and then make use of the resources listed. Reach out for help if you think you or your family may need it.

What are my rights? How can I become a legal permament resident?

Here are some booklets about dating violence and statuatory rape for teens.

If you can't afford a lawyer, you may have to represent yourself in family court. Here are some tips to help your day in court go more smoothly.

If you are bullied or discriminated against because of your sexual orientation or gender expression, there are laws to protect you.

A non-adversarial divorce is a simplified version of a regular divorce. You will have to meet certain conditions in order to qualify. If you qualify, you can get a divorce within 35 days and you may not have to go to court.

This video will guide you through the uncontested divorce process in Connecticut. Uncontested means that you and your spouse agree on all issues surrounding the divorce.

Families Change provides information to help kids, teens, and parents deal with a family breakup like a divorce or separation.

In divorce, separation, and custody cases, parents must give their financial information to the court. The court needs this information to make orders about child support, alimony, or legal fees.

If you can’t afford to pay court fees, you can ask the court for a fee waiver. A fee waiver allows people with very low income to skip paying court costs and fees. You can probably get a fee waiver if you get public benefits such as welfare, food stamps, SNAP, or SSI.

This booklet is designed to help you represent yourself in a divorce.

If you and the other parent agree on custody and visitation, your child probably doesn't need a lawyer. But you may want to ask for one if you and the other parent disagree about custody or visitation; you are worried about your child’s safety; or there is a question about paternity.

Family Services is available to help families and the courts solve problems with child custody, visitation, restraining orders, and more.

Going to court can be stressful. This video will cover everything you need to know about getting ready for a court hearing, including what to wear, who to bring with you, what happens when you see the judge, meeting with a mediator, and more. We hope that you'll feel more at ease and prepared after you watch this video.

If you are in danger of being hurt by a family member or someone you are or have been dating, you can ask the family court for a temporary restraining order (TRO). A temporary restraining order is a paper from the court that tells someone to stop hurting, threatening, or stalking you.

This video tells you how to file for divorce in Connecticut.

Get information about child support services in Connecticut, what what happens when you go to family court, parenting education programs in Connecticut, and more.

If you can't afford a lawyer, you may have to represent yourself in family court. Here are some tips to help your day in court go more smoothly.

This brochure answers frequently asked questions about what happens when you go to court for child support.

Learn how to file a motion for contempt if the other parent has disobeyed a court order, such as orders of custody, child support, visitation, medical bills, or health insurance. 

A dissolution of marriage is Connecticut’s legal term for a divorce. A legal separation is a court order between married people. And an annulment is a court order that says that a marriage never existed in the first place.

Are you going to court without a lawyer?

Represent
Practice going to court with our legal game.

Get help from 2-1-1

Dial 2-1-1 or go to 211ct.org for help with services in your community.

Tell us what you think

Was this website helpful? Take a quick survey.