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Workers’ rights, discrimination, problems with hours and pay, unemployment, Family and Medical Leave (FMLA), criminal records.

Your Rights at Work

You have been called back to work… Now what? Workers across CT are facing a hard dilemma about how to balance risks to their health and livelihood with employer requests that they return to work.

On April 1, 2020, a new law went into effect that requires some employers to give their employees paid leave for reasons related to COVID-19. This law will remain in place until December 31, 2020.

Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont and the Department of Economic and Community Development (DECD) released guidelines for businesses that will be allowed to reopen during Phase 1 of the state’s reopening plan. Also see: Workplace Rules for Essential Employers. As of June 17, certain businesses have been allowed to reopen for Phase 2.

How much must I be paid? Can my employer discipline or fire me? Can I take time off if I am sick or a family member is sick? How do I know if my employer is discriminating against me?

You have rights at work that protect you -- before, during and after pregnancy. Your employer cannot ask you about your plans to have children or about your pregnancy. You cannot be fired, denied a job or promotion, or be treated differently because of pregnancy. Find out about taking time offf for maternity leave in Connecticut, going back to work after giving birth, and more.

The Families First Coronavirus Response Act contains several important paid leave provisions related to COVID-19.

It is against the law for someone to be treated differently because of their race or color, national origin, gender, sex, religion, and more. Here is information on how filing a discrimination complaint with the State of Connecticut.

Learn about your rights and responsibilities as an immigrant worker in the United States.

Get the latest information for Connecticut residents on the COVID-19 outbreak, including checks from the government, court access, DSS benefits, health insurance, drivers's licenses, housing, foreclosures, immigration, utilities, unemployment, and more.

Getting a job is hard, and it can be even harder if you have a criminal record. Many employers will do a background check before they hire you. To know your rights and help you get and keep a job, you need to know what is on your criminal record.

This article talks about time off from work and the Family and Medical Leave (FMLA) in Connecticut. Learn the difference between state and federal leave laws, maternity leave in CT, employment laws and rights, and more.

Most jobs are "at-will." That means your employer can fire you at any time for any reason, unless the reason you are fired is illegal.

This article explains your rights when applying for a job, including criminal records, drug testing, disabilities, pregnancy, discrimination, and more.

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Your Rights at Work

You have been called back to work… Now what? Workers across CT are facing a hard dilemma about how to balance risks to their health and livelihood with employer requests that they return to work.

On April 1, 2020, a new law went into effect that requires some employers to give their employees paid leave for reasons related to COVID-19. This law will remain in place until December 31, 2020.

Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont and the Department of Economic and Community Development (DECD) released guidelines for businesses that will be allowed to reopen during Phase 1 of the state’s reopening plan. Also see: Workplace Rules for Essential Employers. As of June 17, certain businesses have been allowed to reopen for Phase 2.

How much must I be paid? Can my employer discipline or fire me? Can I take time off if I am sick or a family member is sick? How do I know if my employer is discriminating against me?

You have rights at work that protect you -- before, during and after pregnancy. Your employer cannot ask you about your plans to have children or about your pregnancy. You cannot be fired, denied a job or promotion, or be treated differently because of pregnancy. Find out about taking time offf for maternity leave in Connecticut, going back to work after giving birth, and more.

The Families First Coronavirus Response Act contains several important paid leave provisions related to COVID-19.

It is against the law for someone to be treated differently because of their race or color, national origin, gender, sex, religion, and more. Here is information on how filing a discrimination complaint with the State of Connecticut.

Learn about your rights and responsibilities as an immigrant worker in the United States.

Get the latest information for Connecticut residents on the COVID-19 outbreak, including checks from the government, court access, DSS benefits, health insurance, drivers's licenses, housing, foreclosures, immigration, utilities, unemployment, and more.

Getting a job is hard, and it can be even harder if you have a criminal record. Many employers will do a background check before they hire you. To know your rights and help you get and keep a job, you need to know what is on your criminal record.

This article talks about time off from work and the Family and Medical Leave (FMLA) in Connecticut. Learn the difference between state and federal leave laws, maternity leave in CT, employment laws and rights, and more.

Most jobs are "at-will." That means your employer can fire you at any time for any reason, unless the reason you are fired is illegal.

This article explains your rights when applying for a job, including criminal records, drug testing, disabilities, pregnancy, discrimination, and more.