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Domestic violence, child custody and visitation, child support, children’s rights, divorce and separation, bullying, problems with DCF.

Child Custody and Visitation

If your custody or visitation arrangement isn't working, you might be able to get it changed. This article will tell you when an order might be changed, the steps you can take, the court hearing, and more. 

Learn how to file a motion for contempt if the other parent has disobeyed a court order, such as orders of custody, child support, visitation, medical bills, or health insurance. 

If you can’t afford to pay court fees, you can ask the court for a fee waiver. A fee waiver allows people with very low income to skip paying court costs and fees. You can probably get a fee waiver if you get public benefits such as welfare, food stamps, SNAP, or SSI.

Families Change provides information to help kids, teens, and parents deal with a family breakup like a divorce or separation.

If you and the other parent agree on custody and visitation, your child probably doesn't need a lawyer. But you may want to ask for one if you and the other parent disagree about custody or visitation; you are worried about your child’s safety; or there is a question about paternity.

Family Services is available to help families and the courts solve problems with child custody, visitation, restraining orders, and more.

As a father, you have the right to see your child—even if you are behind on child support. Read this article to learn your rights about paternity, visitation, custody, child support, if your child is moving, and more.

Going to court can be stressful. This video will cover everything you need to know about getting ready for a court hearing, including what to wear, who to bring with you, what happens when you see the judge, meeting with a mediator, and more. We hope that you'll feel more at ease and prepared after you watch this video.

In divorce, separation, and custody cases, parents must give their financial information to the court. The court needs this information to make orders about child support, alimony, or legal fees.

Get information about child support services in Connecticut, what what happens when you go to family court, parenting education programs in Connecticut, and more.

If you can't afford a lawyer, you may have to represent yourself in family court. Here are some tips to help your day in court go more smoothly.

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Child Custody and Visitation

If your custody or visitation arrangement isn't working, you might be able to get it changed. This article will tell you when an order might be changed, the steps you can take, the court hearing, and more. 

Learn how to file a motion for contempt if the other parent has disobeyed a court order, such as orders of custody, child support, visitation, medical bills, or health insurance. 

If you can’t afford to pay court fees, you can ask the court for a fee waiver. A fee waiver allows people with very low income to skip paying court costs and fees. You can probably get a fee waiver if you get public benefits such as welfare, food stamps, SNAP, or SSI.

Families Change provides information to help kids, teens, and parents deal with a family breakup like a divorce or separation.

If you and the other parent agree on custody and visitation, your child probably doesn't need a lawyer. But you may want to ask for one if you and the other parent disagree about custody or visitation; you are worried about your child’s safety; or there is a question about paternity.

Family Services is available to help families and the courts solve problems with child custody, visitation, restraining orders, and more.

As a father, you have the right to see your child—even if you are behind on child support. Read this article to learn your rights about paternity, visitation, custody, child support, if your child is moving, and more.

Going to court can be stressful. This video will cover everything you need to know about getting ready for a court hearing, including what to wear, who to bring with you, what happens when you see the judge, meeting with a mediator, and more. We hope that you'll feel more at ease and prepared after you watch this video.

In divorce, separation, and custody cases, parents must give their financial information to the court. The court needs this information to make orders about child support, alimony, or legal fees.

Get information about child support services in Connecticut, what what happens when you go to family court, parenting education programs in Connecticut, and more.

If you can't afford a lawyer, you may have to represent yourself in family court. Here are some tips to help your day in court go more smoothly.