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Evictions, lockouts, security deposits, rent increases, discrimination, foreclosure, homelessness, utilities.

Landlord/Tenant

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a nationwide eviction moratorium from September 4 through December 31, 2020. A moratorium is a temporary halt on evictions. The CDC moratorium prevents landlords from evicting tenants for not paying rent, not paying other charges such as late fees, or because their lease ended.

If your landlord wants to evict you, they must get the court's permission first. Unless your landlord wins in court, they cannot take your things or evict you, even if you owe back rent. Read this article to learn your rights and how you can try to stop the eviction process.

Under an order by Governor Lamont, if you paid a security deposit that is more than one month’s rent, you can ask the landlord to use the portion of your security deposit that is more than one month’s rent toward your rent due between April 1 and September 30, 2020.

You cannot be forced out of your apartment while your landlord is in foreclosure. The law protects your right to stay in your home.

If you have a disagreement or problem with your housing authority, you can use something called a grievance procedure to try to fix the problem. Also learn about steps you can take if you were denied public housing.

This article explains Connecticut laws about lead poisoning.

State and federal fair housing laws prohibit discrimination based on national origin, religion, and ancestry. 

Going to court can be stressful. This video will cover everything you need to know about getting ready for a court hearing, including what to wear, who to bring with you, what happens when you see the judge, meeting with a mediator, and more. We hope that you'll feel more at ease and prepared after you watch this video.

If a Housing Code, Health Department or other official ordered you to move because your apartment is not safe, you may be able to get help from your town under Connecticut's Uniform Relocation Assistance Act.

Watch this video to learn your rights under the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) if you get Section 8. This video covers federal laws, so the information is true no matter what state you live in.

It is against the law for someone to be treated differently because of their race or color, national origin, gender, sex, religion, and more. Here is information on how filing a discrimination complaint with the State of Connecticut.

If you have bed bugs, you are not alone. Cases of bed bugs have been on the rise, especially in the last ten years. Here is some information about dealing with a bed bug infestation.

Get the latest information for Connecticut residents on the COVID-19 outbreak, including checks from the government, court access, DSS benefits, health insurance, drivers's licenses, housing, foreclosures, immigration, utilities, unemployment, and more.

Below is a letter you can use to tell your landlord you can’t pay your rent for a reason related to COVID-19. Unfortunately, there are no more rent extensions, but you should ask your landlord to make a payment plan. If you are able to make a payment plan, try to get the agreement in writing and save a copy for your records.

All renters (also called tenants) have legal rights. You have these rights even if you don't have a written lease, and even if you signed an agreement telling your landlord you would give up your rights.

If you're facing eviction and you don't have a lawyer, you can practice representing yourself by playing our legal game, RePresent: Renter. You’ll learn how to prepare for court, what happens in court on the day of your eviction hearing, and how to present evidence and cross-examine the other person in your case.

This article, by the State of CT Judicial Branch, covers the rights and responsibilities of landlords and tenants in Connecticut.

The landlord must return your security deposit when you move out unless your apartment has been damaged. Read this article to learn your rights if your landlord won't give your security deposit back, what you can do about rent increases, special protections for seniors, and more.

Have you experienced unwanted touching, unwanted sexual advances, sexual jokes, comments, or gestures in your rental housing? Fair housing laws may help you.

The law says your landlord must make your apartment clean and safe when you move in and keep the apartment in good condition while you live there.

Here are some tips to keep in mind if you are fighting an eviction in court and you don't have a lawyer.

Here are some common myths about renting an apartment in Connecticut. Watch this video to learn your rights and help protect yourself as a renter.

You have a right to live in housing that is safe, decent, and has utilities that work. Landlords must provide working equipment for utilities including heating, electricity, plumbing, and both hot and cold running water.

Even if your apartment needs repairs, you need to pay your rent on time every month. If you don’t, you risk being evicted. This video explains what to do if your apartment needs repairs.

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Landlord/Tenant

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a nationwide eviction moratorium from September 4 through December 31, 2020. A moratorium is a temporary halt on evictions. The CDC moratorium prevents landlords from evicting tenants for not paying rent, not paying other charges such as late fees, or because their lease ended.

If your landlord wants to evict you, they must get the court's permission first. Unless your landlord wins in court, they cannot take your things or evict you, even if you owe back rent. Read this article to learn your rights and how you can try to stop the eviction process.

Under an order by Governor Lamont, if you paid a security deposit that is more than one month’s rent, you can ask the landlord to use the portion of your security deposit that is more than one month’s rent toward your rent due between April 1 and September 30, 2020.

You cannot be forced out of your apartment while your landlord is in foreclosure. The law protects your right to stay in your home.

If you have a disagreement or problem with your housing authority, you can use something called a grievance procedure to try to fix the problem. Also learn about steps you can take if you were denied public housing.

This article explains Connecticut laws about lead poisoning.

State and federal fair housing laws prohibit discrimination based on national origin, religion, and ancestry. 

Going to court can be stressful. This video will cover everything you need to know about getting ready for a court hearing, including what to wear, who to bring with you, what happens when you see the judge, meeting with a mediator, and more. We hope that you'll feel more at ease and prepared after you watch this video.

If a Housing Code, Health Department or other official ordered you to move because your apartment is not safe, you may be able to get help from your town under Connecticut's Uniform Relocation Assistance Act.

Watch this video to learn your rights under the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) if you get Section 8. This video covers federal laws, so the information is true no matter what state you live in.

It is against the law for someone to be treated differently because of their race or color, national origin, gender, sex, religion, and more. Here is information on how filing a discrimination complaint with the State of Connecticut.

If you have bed bugs, you are not alone. Cases of bed bugs have been on the rise, especially in the last ten years. Here is some information about dealing with a bed bug infestation.

Get the latest information for Connecticut residents on the COVID-19 outbreak, including checks from the government, court access, DSS benefits, health insurance, drivers's licenses, housing, foreclosures, immigration, utilities, unemployment, and more.

Below is a letter you can use to tell your landlord you can’t pay your rent for a reason related to COVID-19. Unfortunately, there are no more rent extensions, but you should ask your landlord to make a payment plan. If you are able to make a payment plan, try to get the agreement in writing and save a copy for your records.

All renters (also called tenants) have legal rights. You have these rights even if you don't have a written lease, and even if you signed an agreement telling your landlord you would give up your rights.

If you're facing eviction and you don't have a lawyer, you can practice representing yourself by playing our legal game, RePresent: Renter. You’ll learn how to prepare for court, what happens in court on the day of your eviction hearing, and how to present evidence and cross-examine the other person in your case.

This article, by the State of CT Judicial Branch, covers the rights and responsibilities of landlords and tenants in Connecticut.

The landlord must return your security deposit when you move out unless your apartment has been damaged. Read this article to learn your rights if your landlord won't give your security deposit back, what you can do about rent increases, special protections for seniors, and more.

Have you experienced unwanted touching, unwanted sexual advances, sexual jokes, comments, or gestures in your rental housing? Fair housing laws may help you.

The law says your landlord must make your apartment clean and safe when you move in and keep the apartment in good condition while you live there.

Here are some tips to keep in mind if you are fighting an eviction in court and you don't have a lawyer.

Here are some common myths about renting an apartment in Connecticut. Watch this video to learn your rights and help protect yourself as a renter.

You have a right to live in housing that is safe, decent, and has utilities that work. Landlords must provide working equipment for utilities including heating, electricity, plumbing, and both hot and cold running water.

Even if your apartment needs repairs, you need to pay your rent on time every month. If you don’t, you risk being evicted. This video explains what to do if your apartment needs repairs.