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Evictions, lockouts, security deposits, rent increases, discrimination, foreclosure, homelessness, utilities.

Homelessness

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a nationwide eviction moratorium from September 4 through December 31, 2020. A moratorium is a temporary halt on evictions. The CDC moratorium prevents landlords from evicting tenants for not paying rent, not paying other charges such as late fees, or because their lease ended.

Do you need help paying your bills? Find out about programs that can provide cash, food, housing, medical care, child care, energy assistance, and more. This information can help people with or without kids, veterans, people who have a disability, teens living on their own, and more.

You cannot be forced out of your apartment while your landlord is in foreclosure. The law protects your right to stay in your home.

Were you kicked out of your house? Did you run away? Do you live in a shelter or temporarily with a friend? Did your family lose their housing?

If your landlord wants to evict you, they must get the court's permission first. Unless your landlord wins in court, they cannot take your things or evict you, even if you owe back rent. Read this article to learn your rights and how you can try to stop the eviction process.

If a Housing Code, Health Department or other official ordered you to move because your apartment is not safe, you may be able to get help from your town under Connecticut's Uniform Relocation Assistance Act.

Under an order by Governor Lamont, if you paid a security deposit that is more than one month’s rent, you can ask the landlord to use the portion of your security deposit that is more than one month’s rent toward your rent due between April 1 and September 30, 2020.

Get the latest information for Connecticut residents on the COVID-19 outbreak, including checks from the government, court access, DSS benefits, health insurance, drivers's licenses, housing, foreclosures, immigration, utilities, unemployment, and more.

Below is a letter you can use to tell your landlord you can’t pay your rent for a reason related to COVID-19. Unfortunately, there are no more rent extensions, but you should ask your landlord to make a payment plan. If you are able to make a payment plan, try to get the agreement in writing and save a copy for your records.

Here are some resources to help you find an apartment, including dealing with discrimination, references, security deposits, staying in your apartment, moving out, the security deposit guarantee program, and more.

If you're facing eviction and you don't have a lawyer, you can practice representing yourself by playing our legal game, RePresent: Renter. You’ll learn how to prepare for court, what happens in court on the day of your eviction hearing, and how to present evidence and cross-examine the other person in your case.

The Roadmap to Reentry Legal Guide is a resource for navigating the legal impact of a criminal record on getting ID, housing, public benefits, and family issues.

Get help from 2-1-1

Dial 2-1-1 or go to 211ct.org for help with services in your community.

COVID-19: Get information about court access, work, benefits, housing, and more.
The Temporary Rental Housing Assistance Program (TRHAP) is open. Get information on the TRHAP website.
Statewide Legal Services of Connecticut is open to serve you! Call 1-800-453-3320 or apply for legal help online.
Are you having difficulty getting or keeping your health care? Tell us your story.

Homelessness

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a nationwide eviction moratorium from September 4 through December 31, 2020. A moratorium is a temporary halt on evictions. The CDC moratorium prevents landlords from evicting tenants for not paying rent, not paying other charges such as late fees, or because their lease ended.

Do you need help paying your bills? Find out about programs that can provide cash, food, housing, medical care, child care, energy assistance, and more. This information can help people with or without kids, veterans, people who have a disability, teens living on their own, and more.

You cannot be forced out of your apartment while your landlord is in foreclosure. The law protects your right to stay in your home.

Were you kicked out of your house? Did you run away? Do you live in a shelter or temporarily with a friend? Did your family lose their housing?

If your landlord wants to evict you, they must get the court's permission first. Unless your landlord wins in court, they cannot take your things or evict you, even if you owe back rent. Read this article to learn your rights and how you can try to stop the eviction process.

If a Housing Code, Health Department or other official ordered you to move because your apartment is not safe, you may be able to get help from your town under Connecticut's Uniform Relocation Assistance Act.

Under an order by Governor Lamont, if you paid a security deposit that is more than one month’s rent, you can ask the landlord to use the portion of your security deposit that is more than one month’s rent toward your rent due between April 1 and September 30, 2020.

Get the latest information for Connecticut residents on the COVID-19 outbreak, including checks from the government, court access, DSS benefits, health insurance, drivers's licenses, housing, foreclosures, immigration, utilities, unemployment, and more.

Below is a letter you can use to tell your landlord you can’t pay your rent for a reason related to COVID-19. Unfortunately, there are no more rent extensions, but you should ask your landlord to make a payment plan. If you are able to make a payment plan, try to get the agreement in writing and save a copy for your records.

Here are some resources to help you find an apartment, including dealing with discrimination, references, security deposits, staying in your apartment, moving out, the security deposit guarantee program, and more.

If you're facing eviction and you don't have a lawyer, you can practice representing yourself by playing our legal game, RePresent: Renter. You’ll learn how to prepare for court, what happens in court on the day of your eviction hearing, and how to present evidence and cross-examine the other person in your case.

The Roadmap to Reentry Legal Guide is a resource for navigating the legal impact of a criminal record on getting ID, housing, public benefits, and family issues.