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Representing Yourself in Court

If you're going to court without a lawyer, you can practice representing yourself by playing our legal game, RePresent. You’ll learn how to prepare for court, what happens in court on the day of your hearing, and how to present evidence and cross-examine the other person in your case.

Most state courthouses and clerk’s offices have re-opened to the public. If you have questions about the status of your case or about visiting the court in person, you can call the court where your case is being heard and follow the instructions to speak with a court staff person, email questions to a Court Service Center staff person, or look up your case online.

CT Safe Connect was developed as a way to make it easier for victims of domestic violence to access information, resources and assistance. If you need help or just someone to talk to, visit CTSafeConnect.org or call/text (888) 774-2900. Advocates are available 24/7.

Going to court can be stressful. This video will cover everything you need to know about getting ready for a court hearing, including what to wear, who to bring with you, what happens when you see the judge, meeting with a mediator, and more. We hope that you'll feel more at ease and prepared after you watch this video.

If you are suing someone in small claims court, it's important that you correctly serve the papers to the other party. Watch this video to learn how.

Get the latest information for Connecticut residents on the COVID-19 outbreak, including checks from the government, court access, DSS benefits, health insurance, drivers's licenses, housing, foreclosures, immigration, utilities, unemployment, and more.

If you're facing eviction and you don't have a lawyer, you can practice representing yourself by playing our legal game, RePresent: Renter. You’ll learn how to prepare for court, what happens in court on the day of your eviction hearing, and how to present evidence and cross-examine the other person in your case.

When you are giving evidence in court, explain exactly what happened in the clearest way you can. You should only talk about what you know. This means what you saw, what you felt, what you heard, and what you did.

If you can't afford a lawyer, you may have to represent yourself in family court. Here are some tips to help your day in court go more smoothly.

Are you going to court without a lawyer?

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Practice going to court with our legal game.

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COVID-19: Get information about court access, work, benefits, housing, and more.
The Temporary Rental Housing Assistance Program (TRHAP) is open. Get information on the TRHAP website.
Statewide Legal Services of Connecticut is open to serve you! Call 1-800-453-3320 or apply for legal help online.
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Representing Yourself in Court

If you're going to court without a lawyer, you can practice representing yourself by playing our legal game, RePresent. You’ll learn how to prepare for court, what happens in court on the day of your hearing, and how to present evidence and cross-examine the other person in your case.

Most state courthouses and clerk’s offices have re-opened to the public. If you have questions about the status of your case or about visiting the court in person, you can call the court where your case is being heard and follow the instructions to speak with a court staff person, email questions to a Court Service Center staff person, or look up your case online.

CT Safe Connect was developed as a way to make it easier for victims of domestic violence to access information, resources and assistance. If you need help or just someone to talk to, visit CTSafeConnect.org or call/text (888) 774-2900. Advocates are available 24/7.

Going to court can be stressful. This video will cover everything you need to know about getting ready for a court hearing, including what to wear, who to bring with you, what happens when you see the judge, meeting with a mediator, and more. We hope that you'll feel more at ease and prepared after you watch this video.

If you are suing someone in small claims court, it's important that you correctly serve the papers to the other party. Watch this video to learn how.

Get the latest information for Connecticut residents on the COVID-19 outbreak, including checks from the government, court access, DSS benefits, health insurance, drivers's licenses, housing, foreclosures, immigration, utilities, unemployment, and more.

If you're facing eviction and you don't have a lawyer, you can practice representing yourself by playing our legal game, RePresent: Renter. You’ll learn how to prepare for court, what happens in court on the day of your eviction hearing, and how to present evidence and cross-examine the other person in your case.

When you are giving evidence in court, explain exactly what happened in the clearest way you can. You should only talk about what you know. This means what you saw, what you felt, what you heard, and what you did.

If you can't afford a lawyer, you may have to represent yourself in family court. Here are some tips to help your day in court go more smoothly.