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Domestic violence, child custody and visitation, child support, children’s rights, divorce and separation, bullying, and more.

Abuse and Violence

If you are in danger of being hurt by a family member or someone you are or have been dating, you can ask the family court for a temporary restraining order (TRO). A temporary restraining order is a paper from the court that tells someone to stop hurting, threatening, or stalking you.

CT Safe Connect’s domestic violence hotlines are open. Call or text 1-888-774-2900 or use the chat function at www.ctsafeconnect.com.

If you and the other parent agree on custody and visitation, your child probably doesn't need a lawyer. But you may want to ask for one if you and the other parent disagree about custody or visitation; you are worried about your child’s safety; or there is a question about paternity.

The Address Confidentiality Program is available for Connecticut residents who are or have been victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, or risk of injury to a minor. If you have moved or are planning to move and want to keep your new address private, Safe at Home can help.

CT Safe Connect was developed as a way to make it easier for victims of domestic violence to access information, resources and assistance. If you need help or just someone to talk to, visit CTSafeConnect.org or call/text (888) 774-2900. Advocates are available 24/7.

CT SAVIN is a free victim notification service for events happening in the criminal court.

Are you worried about losing your job because of family violence? This article explains Connecticut’s Family Violence Leave law and can help you write a letter to your employer asking for time off to deal with family violence or abuse.

Safety first. If you are in danger, call 9-1-1 for the Police. Physical abuse by your spouse or partner is illegal. Your safety is most important. If you are frightened about something in your relationship, please call the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1−800−799−SAFE (7233) or TTY 1−800−787−3224. You can call 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

Going to court can be stressful. This video will cover everything you need to know about getting ready for a court hearing, including what to wear, who to bring with you, what happens when you see the judge, meeting with a mediator, and more. We hope that you'll feel more at ease and prepared after you watch this video.

Do you use Facebook, Twitter, or other social networking sites? Do you have a smartphone? This article can help you stay safe if you're experiencing family violence.

If you can't afford a lawyer, you may have to represent yourself in family court. Here are some tips to help your day in court go more smoothly.

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Get help from 2-1-1

Dial 2-1-1 or go to 211ct.org for help with services in your community.

Statewide Legal Services of Connecticut is open to serve you! Call 1-800-453-3320 or apply for legal help online. Are you having difficulty getting or keeping your health care? Tell us your story.

Abuse and Violence

If you are in danger of being hurt by a family member or someone you are or have been dating, you can ask the family court for a temporary restraining order (TRO). A temporary restraining order is a paper from the court that tells someone to stop hurting, threatening, or stalking you.

CT Safe Connect’s domestic violence hotlines are open. Call or text 1-888-774-2900 or use the chat function at www.ctsafeconnect.com.

If you and the other parent agree on custody and visitation, your child probably doesn't need a lawyer. But you may want to ask for one if you and the other parent disagree about custody or visitation; you are worried about your child’s safety; or there is a question about paternity.

The Address Confidentiality Program is available for Connecticut residents who are or have been victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, or risk of injury to a minor. If you have moved or are planning to move and want to keep your new address private, Safe at Home can help.

CT Safe Connect was developed as a way to make it easier for victims of domestic violence to access information, resources and assistance. If you need help or just someone to talk to, visit CTSafeConnect.org or call/text (888) 774-2900. Advocates are available 24/7.

CT SAVIN is a free victim notification service for events happening in the criminal court.

Are you worried about losing your job because of family violence? This article explains Connecticut’s Family Violence Leave law and can help you write a letter to your employer asking for time off to deal with family violence or abuse.

Safety first. If you are in danger, call 9-1-1 for the Police. Physical abuse by your spouse or partner is illegal. Your safety is most important. If you are frightened about something in your relationship, please call the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1−800−799−SAFE (7233) or TTY 1−800−787−3224. You can call 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

Going to court can be stressful. This video will cover everything you need to know about getting ready for a court hearing, including what to wear, who to bring with you, what happens when you see the judge, meeting with a mediator, and more. We hope that you'll feel more at ease and prepared after you watch this video.

Do you use Facebook, Twitter, or other social networking sites? Do you have a smartphone? This article can help you stay safe if you're experiencing family violence.

If you can't afford a lawyer, you may have to represent yourself in family court. Here are some tips to help your day in court go more smoothly.